Treadmill Walking Video for Bozeman, MT

Bozeman has gotten pretty famous over the last decade as it’s been included in way too many “Best of” lists for its own good. Still, people love it in spite of its massive growth. I hope you enjoy it too.

Museum, MSU, and South Side – Bozeman Montana – Virtual Walks for Treadmill City Walks 4K

Replica T-Rex skeleton in front of Museum of the Rockies during virtual walk
“Big Mike” The MOR is a jewel of Bozeman and you should check it out if you can.

We have a hazy August day to walk through Bozeman, MT. Recent wildfires across the west had really made the sky nearly apocalyptic. It was like that most of the summer. Luckily we don’t work too hard on this one.

In today’s virtual walk for treadmill we start off where the last Bozeman walk ended, at the Museum of the Rockies. We start in front of Big Mike, the metal sculpture of a T-rex and then see the 1890s living history home. The Museum of the Rockies does not disappoint and kids love it.  In the summer, I love the living history section with frontier re-enactors and sample farm.

Then we move on to MSU campus. It’s quiet during the summer even though a few classes are in session. They’ve really added a bunch of cool buildings and architecture to the campus.

From there, we head into the South Side neighborhood and pass by the Story Mansion. Finally, we end up at Burke Park near Peets Hill and Downtown. -Henry

Norm Asbjornson Hall at MSU Campus in Bozeman during virtual walks
MSU Campus is quiet in the summer but has lots of new buildings

More Virtual City Walks of Bozeman:

Walking Bozeman, MT South Side District
Bozeman, Montana – South Side Walking Tour
Bozeman, MT Walking Tour – Summer
Bozeman, Montana Virtual Halloween Walking Tour
Downtown Bozeman, MT Virtual Treadmill Workout
Bozeman, Montana Virtual Walking Tour
Bozeman, Montana – Sunny Winter Walk

People on Bikes on bridge to Burk Park during our citywalks
People in Bozeman are active

Wikipedia:

MOR

Museum of the Rockies is a museum in Bozeman, Montana. The museum is known for its paleontological collections, although these are not its sole focus. The Museum of the Rockies houses the largest collection of dinosaur remains in the United States, possessing the largest Tyrannosaurus skull ever discovered, as well as the thigh bone of a Tyrannosaurus rex that contains soft-tissue remains.

The museum is part of the Montana Dinosaur Trail and is Montana’s official repository for paleontological specimens. The museum’s collections focus on the physical and cultural history of the Rocky Mountains and the people and animals who have lived there, and date back more than 500 million years. Permanent exhibits include: “Enduring Peoples”, which chronicles the life of Native Americans on the Northern Plains and near the Rocky Mountains; “History of the Northern Rocky Mountain Region”, whose inhabitants included Native Americans, fur traders, gold seekers, and settlers from frontier days through World War II; the Living History Farm, which includes the Tinsley House, where costumed interpreters demonstrate life in a turn-of-the-century home; and the Taylor Planetarium, a 40 ft (12 m), 104-seat domed theater.

Story Mansion

Nelson Story Sr. (April 4, 1838 – March 10, 1926) was a pioneer Montana entrepreneur, cattle rancher, miner and vigilante, who was a notable resident of Bozeman, Montana. He was best known for his 1866 cattle drive from Texas with approximately 1000 head of Texas Longhorns[2] to Montana along the Bozeman Trail—the first major cattle drive from Texas into Montana. His business ventures in Bozeman were so successful that he became the town’s first millionaire. In 1893, he played a prominent role in the establishment of the Agricultural College of the State of Montana by donating land and facilities. He built the first Story Mansion on Main Street in Bozeman in 1880 and later built today’s Story Mansion at the corner of Willson and College for his son, T. Byron Story in 1910. In his later years, he became a prominent real estate developer in Los Angeles, California.

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